Degenerative Joints

Cartilage is the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions your bones at the joints. It allows bones to glide over one another. When the cartilage breaks down and wears away, the bones rub together. This often causes the pain, swelling, and stiffness.

Degenerative joint disease, most commonly known as osteoarthritis, is a painful degenerative condition that results in the deterioration of cartilage tissues that support the weight-bearing joints in the body. Once the cartilage is thinned or lost, the constant grinding of bones against each other causes pain and stiffness around the joint. Abnormal and excess bone formations called spurs grow from the damaged bones, causing further pain and stiffness. Statistics show that degenerative joint disease affects 80% of people over the age of 60.

Soft Tissue Injuries

The most common soft tissues injured are muscles, tendons, and ligaments. These injuries often occur during sports and exercise activities, but sometimes simple everyday activities can cause an injury.

Sprains, strains, and contusions, as well as tendinitis and bursitis, are common soft-tissue injuries. Even with appropriate treatment, these injuries may require a prolonged amount of time to heal.

PHYSIOTHERAPY and OSTEOPATHY

The purpose of physiotherapy in the sub-acute injury phase is to assist nature to quickly reduce the inflammation, hasten the healing process and avoid complications such as joint stiffness, muscle tightness and weakness which may predispose you to re-injury.

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